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Don’t Forget the Songs-365: Mach Tres: Day 009
Fri, Jan 25, 2013

“Ten Years Gone”
Led Zeppelin

1975

“♫ In
the midst/ I
think of you
and how it
used to
be
♫”

I woke up to the sounds of rain drops and the opening chords of “Ten Years Gone” floating, in my head, deeper inside of me. Did you know this last song on side three of Physical Graffiti was original supposed to be a multi-layered Jimmy Page instrumental recording?

As I hear Page’s eternal chords serenading me just slightly hover, riffing above the open window rain drops washing over me, I am reminded of what Robert Plant said to Rolling Stone’s Cameron Crowe, circa 1975, “Let me tell you a little story behind the song ‘Ten Years Gone’ on our new album. I was working my ass off before joining Zeppelin. A lady I really dearly loved said, ‘Right. It’s me or your fans.’ Not that I had fans, but I said, ‘I can’t stop, I’ve got to keep going.’ She’s quite content these days, I imagine. She’s got a washing machine that works by itself and a little sports-car. We wouldn’t have anything to say anymore. I could probably relate to her, but she couldn’t relate to me. I’d be smiling too much. Ten years gone, I’m afraid. Anyway, there’s a gamble for you.”

Jimmy’s guitar brilliance masterfully brings Robert’s lyrical lament to life as Plant looks back with the longing of the former love and the road they never traveled down together. Plant talked about Page’s guitar genius when he said, “Jimmy is the man who is the music. He goes away to his house and works on it a lot and then brings it to the band in its skeletal state. Slowly everybody brings their personality into it. This new flower sort of grows out of it. “Ten Years Gone” was painstakingly pieced together from sections he’d written.

Robert Plant’s ghosts of lovers past, rekindle emotions dancing over Jimmy Page’s guitar canvas, making “Ten Years Gone” a timeless rock and roll reflection, echoing The Road Not Taken. As Jimmy’s riffs continue reigning deeper, re-glimpse memories like lost loves remembered, “Ten Years Gone—” will never be forgotten.

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