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Don’t Forget the Songs-365: Mach Dos: Day 290
Monday, Oct 28, 2012

“Silly Love Songs”
Paul McCartney & Wings

1976

“♫ How can I
tell you about
my loved
one
♫”

When I was younger, I used to sit down alone in our living room by our mega huge stereo speakers and listen to the radio. My Mami had good taste, her favorite Beatle was always Paul so when her favorite radio station would play any songs from McCartney or Wings, she would always turn up the volume. By cranking it up was my way of knowing my Mami’s beloved songs; “Silly Love Songs” would make my Mami smile, so when I hear this Wings classic, to this day, it never fails to cheer me up.

Written in Hawaii, Paul talked about how he came up with “Silly Love Songs” sound as recounted in John Blaney’s book “Lennon & McCartney: Together Alone,” when he said, “We really pushed the bass and drums right out front. But it pushed the song along quite nicely. Pushed it hard. We wanted to make something you could dance to.” Funny thing is that I don’t think of “Silly Love Songs” as a dance number, that one is Paul and Wings ode to Latin disco flavored 1979 hit, “Goodnight Tonight.”

What I love most about “Silly Love Songs” are the three part harmonies by Paul, Linda and Denny Laine when they trade backing vocals. Linda sings the “I can’t explain […]” part as Paul croons “I Love You” while Denny sings “How can I tell you about my love?” that sectionis one of the best three part harmonies in pop history. I urge you to put on some headphones, close your eyes and let their vocals take you away. I bet you even Brian Wilson was impressed what Paul, Linda and Denny accomplished on the quintessential love song of the seventies.

In case you’re wonder why Paul McCartney wrote “Silly Love Songs,” Macca explained when he said, “I thought, so what’s wrong with silly love songs? I was striking a blow for nice, sentimental love songs.” Paul’s right, sometimes you want to turn on the radio because you just really need to hear a heartfelt pop tune; and for me, there’s none sweeter than Paul McCartney’s “Silly Love Songs.”

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